14 Comments

I have cerebral palsy too -- I was born premature, in 1994. I don't think I'd like this sort of book either, after actually reading some of it, and after reading this review. I think we need more stories from disabled people themselves, not from their parents or family. We have a lot to say, it's just that many people don't want to listen.

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I totally agree. And I want to hear what you have to say. I just subbed to your newsletter.

Writing is such a great medium of expression. If you can capture someone’s attention, they can’t interrupt you. My writing has connected me to people in totally unpredictable ways that would’ve been impossible otherwise. Keep writing and connecting with people both online and off. I promise you that in the long run it’ll be worth it.

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I enjoyed that you wrote this as a letter to the author. I never heard of the author or book before.

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Thanks, Erin!

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I haven't read this book, but even with the flaws you point out, it sounds like something I should check out. And it really is too bad that the author didn't include the information about creating the group, but I know I am glad that she did.

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I think it's worth a read. Just don't get your hopes up for a masterpiece :)

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I liked your review. Tangential to this, I feel a weird tension sometimes when I read a book with which I can relate but it doesn't deliver the goods.

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Yeah, I agree. I don’t experience it often, but maybe that’s because I mostly gravitate towards stories I can’t relate to as much.

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I read KAREN years ago, when I was a teenager. I read it more than once. I could never have brought to the reading what you have brought to it but even so, I was struck then by how Killellea bucked authorities and persisted.

Much later, in my twenties, I interviewed a couple with CP who had had a child together in defiance of all those who tried to stop them. They were not pie-eyed dreamers. They were practical and aware of the difficulties they had and would have with a toddler who could move so differently from them and whose speech would be so much more easily understood. They were doing what all parents do - approaching each day with a kind of courage and faith that they would have what they need when they needed it.

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I, too, was struck by Killilea’s persistence, especially given how different things were for disabled people as well as women, more generally, back then.

That’s an incredible story about the couple you know. Props to them for doing what they want, despite what others tell them they should or shouldn’t do.

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Such an interesting concept. I admire your honesty on all fronts in this piece.

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Thank you, Huw!

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Aug 13, 2022Liked by Lyle McKeany

Well said Kyle. I think you are an amazing dad. And ‘Em is blessed to have you. Keep writing

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♥️

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